Article Submissions Accepted During Vacation

beer-summer-fuerteventura-holidays-85961We are going on a little vacation. During the next month we will update our stores, process orders, handle questions and publish articles that users would like to submit to the website but we won’t be creating new content during this time.

This means that Game Worn Radio will be cancelled for tonight and will resume one month from today.

The Cost of a Team Jersey

IMG_1359

Most collectors wont pay $200-250 for a game issued jersey with the exception of a few players.  Unfortunately for teams and distributors, this is the actual cost of producing the jersey itself, so when game issue jerseys get discounted down from $200-250, the team takes a loss.  This is why many teams start auctions and pricing at $250 to the dismay of some collectors.

A larger issue for the team is when the team switches jersey styles or the league uses different models.  These model and style changes can leave teams with an overstock of unusable jerseys at about $160 a piece.  Lettering, numbers, and stitching the appropriate patches on a jersey end up running the price up another $75-100 per jersey for game issued jerseys.

The Reebok to Adidas switch this year has left some teams with an overstock of team issue jerseys.  Meigray, who from what I understand handle the purchase and lettering of the jerseys while sending the final product to the teams for use, seems to have a decent among of stock on hand creating a great opportunity for jersey collectors to get as close as you can to an on-ice authentic as possible (just find lettering).  Right now, you can find team issue jerseys from Meigray teams on ebay for a fraction of the cost of the jersey to the team in order to eliminate old stock.

If you didn’t know the cost of purchasing and lettering a jersey, you may now understand why the most common baseline for a jersey is roughly $250.

Gameworn.us in Syracuse this Weekend

20140617180314!SyracuseCrunch

Gameworn.us will be in Syracuse, NY this weekend to take in a couple Syracuse Crunch games.  We are already looking forward to meeting a number of collectors in the area and if you plan on attending the games, you can join the fun.

If you are interested in any items we have on our Crunch Page or Facebook Store let us know in advance so we can bring it!

Game Worn Radio: Hobby Economics, Value, TimberGraphs

We discuss some topics that we saw throughout some of the groups involving the valuation of jerseys, economics in the hobby and the etiquette that surround these attributes.

We introduce TimberGraphs which make wooden signatures of your favorite players that enhance your displays.

Audio Only:

New Partner: TimberGraphs

Gameworn.us has partnered with TimberGraphs as an opportunity to connect collectors to new and exciting was to accent their game worn displays.

TimberGraphs are hand cut and shaped pieces of art of your favorite players autograph.  They are cut, sanded and finished individually giving each piece a unique touch.  

Here, you can see a sample of Steve Yzerman and Gordie Howe TimberGraphs and an example how it can accent your displays.

TimberGraphs are priced based on complexity of the piece and range from $150 to $250.  Players that have not already been stenciled can be custom requested which includes a custom analysis to translate the work into a wooden medium.  Lead times are adjusted as order volume increases which you will be able to see on our partner pages.

To place your order for TimberGraphs, visit our partner page here.  For questions concerning TimberGraphs, please use our Contact Us page.

How Do You Display Your Collection?

by Chuck EckelsIMG_0100

There are as many different ways to display your collection as there are collectors. The best way to display your collection is up to you. Living in a 3 bedroom town home with our daughter gone, my wife did not put up any opposition to me having a “hockey room”. There is a room in our house devoted to my passion for the game with a big screen TV.

I collect minor league vintage jerseys. I think it reminds me of my youth. ( I have changed directions so many times my friends have joked that I don’t collect jerseys,  I only rent them.) The way I like to display them is with a vintage pennant and a vintage piece of cardboard. I like the aesthetics of this method. The downside to this process is that it limits the number of shirts I can display or keep in my collection. If I can’t display it or look at it, there is no joy in having it. Toy collectors like to have the cardboard box the toy came in because most people threw the box away or the cardboard simply didn’t survive.  I feel the same way about vintage hockey cardboard and pennants.

I have included three jerseys in my limited collection. First up is a San Diego Gulls 72-73 dureen Jersey. The white WHL jerseys are difficult to find because most of the whites were given to the players. The road blue jerseys were offered to the public. Adding the WHL 25th patch and this style is not easy to find. The white WHL pennant is extremely easy to find. One could pick one up on eBay for $10. The John Adams litho was given out at Gulls games in 1974. Not many survived, so it’s difficult to find one. There’s a puck hitting the blocker in this litho. The artist had to draw the puck in the photo to cover the word Cooper he had written on the blocker because of copyright infringement. My favorite Gulls story from this era involves Bob Courcy. Bob was offered an NHL contract by the Flyers but he turned it down . He had a girlfriend in every WHL city and preferred that to skating for Philadelphia.

Game Worn Radio: Viris Returns, Questionable Gretzky, State of the Hobby

Nick Viris rejoins us on Game Worn Radio to talk about concerns regarding recuperating losses or recourse when collectors discover fake jerseys and the timelines they have to act based on their payment method.

After we fixed some mic issues, we talked about a Gretzky jersey that was up for auction with some curious information attached to the auction.

Finally Nick joins us to talk about the state of the hobby and what we can do in the future to make sure we sustain a healthy community.

Audio Only: